and the cult of self-worship
Published on October 13, 2007 By lulapilgrim In Religion
As so often happens, one forum discussion leads to an other one. Such is the case here. This one comes directly out of EmperorofIceCream’s forum “Why there is no sin” in which one poster wrote the following:

It is nice to think of a one world religion and everyone abiding by the laws set forth by it, imagining everyone living peacefully, helping one another, and not have pointless wars, but that will never happen... and frankly, I wouldn't want it to be that way.

Although I think the reference was to Christianity, I pointed out that for some time the United Nations and the European Union have been busily developing their "one world religion". It's called secular and atheistic humanism. Here in America ever since the 60’s, the secularization process is progressing at an amazingly rapid speed.

To which another poster replied, “humanism isn't a religion of any type”.

So is it? Is Secular Humanism a religion?

I say yes it is. In 1965, the Supreme Court recognized Secular Humanism as a religion in its decision, the United States vs. Seeger. Even the Humanist Manifestos speak of religious humanism. Secular Humanism is a philosophical way of life, a belief system that secular humanists live by.

Could it depend on one's definition of religion? If we limit ourselves to Webster's primary definition of religion which is " the belief and worship of God ", then Secular Humanism is not a religion. But when you get to Webster's 4th definition that religion is " anything done or followed with reverence or devotion", then based on this expansion of the definition, Secular Humanism fits the definition of religion. This is exactly what the court case, United States vs Seeger, did in 1965....it essentially broadened the definition of the word "religion". Buddhism fits with this 4th definition. Buddhism is one of the world's leading religions, yet Buddhists don't believe in or worship a Supreme Being called God.

Here in the US and many European countries Christianity is being supplanted by the religion of Secular Humanism.

What is the doctrinal faith of Secular Humanism based upon and how is Secular Humanism being propagated?

The tenets of Secular Humanism come from the Humanist Manifest I and II and in the Secular Humanist Declaration. They are as follows:

The first tenet of Secular Humanism denies the relevance of Almighty God and in place of worship and prayer finds his faith in a heightened sense of personal life and in a cooperative effort to promote social well-being.

The second tenet of Secular Humanism is the belief that man can begin with himself and on the basis of “human reason” alone can think out the answers to the great questions which confront mankind.

The third tenet of Secular Humanism is the belief in the inevitably of progress perpetuated through the Evolutionary Theory and its cultural application of Social Darwinism.

The fourth tenet of Secular Humanism is the belief in science as the guide to human progress and the ultimate provider of an alternative to both religion and morals. Therefore, science itself assumes a religious character and we have certainly seen this recently in radical environmentalism and global warming alarmists.

The fifth tenet of Secular Humanism is the belief in self-sufficiency and centrality of man. This tenet encompasses the assertion of the autonomy and independence of man apart from Almighty God thereby releasing mankind from all obligations to Him. This tenet promulgates the idea that man’s future and salvation is in man’s hands, thus, man not God controls the destiny of the human race.

Secular Humanism is propagated through public education, the media, the courts, and through other governmental agencies.

As man more and more declares his independence from traditional moral and religious restraints, does he soar to the heights of Neitsche's superman, but finds himself drawn to his lower nature and more often than not in the gutter of life?

I'll be using James Hitchcock's book , " What is Secular Humanism?" as a guideline. He points out that the Jesuit theologian, Henri DeLubac said that every Humanist system in the ends betrays man. There is a major and inevitable gulf between what it promises and what it is able to fulfill.

Secular Humanism promises total freedom, but man can exercise freedom, paradoxically, on in fulfillment of the commands of his Creator. All of us chafe at the limitations of life, but the Humanist acts of defiance and heedless disregard end by enslaving the individuals to his passions and to the inexorable march of history.

Since man was created by an All-Wise and All-Loving God, he cannot be truly free or happy except in loving obedience to his Creator's will. "You shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free."

Comments (Page 1)
on Oct 13, 2007
Regarding Secular Humanism, Homer Duncan said, It is unbelievable but true, the American taxpayers are paying for their own destruction.

And Dr. L. Nelson Bell said, Christians need to recognize the solemn fact that Humanism is not an ally in making the world a better place in which to live. It is a deadly enemy for it is a religion without God and without hope in this world or the next.

We certainly live in very interesting times.
on Oct 13, 2007
YES
on Oct 13, 2007
KFC, You do my heart good.
on Oct 13, 2007
Well...I'm in a religion class...the definition we've been using is:

A system of symbols(creed, code, cultus) by means of which people (community) orient themselves in the world with reference to both ordinary and extraordinary powers, meanings, and values. It is also a matter of praxis(doing, not believing.) Discussing religion solely as faith excludes the embodied physical, spatial, and geographic dimensions of religion.

In short, it defines people as who they are and how they fit into the world and is often indicated by rituals and how people conduct themselves.

So yes, secular humanism could indeed be a religion of sorts.

~Zoo
on Oct 13, 2007
So yes, secular humanism could indeed be a religion of sorts.


Thanks for the input Zoo and making the tally 3 to 0. Good luck in your class.

on Oct 13, 2007

Good luck in your class.

Heh, it's an easy class.  I have an A.

~Zoo

(Hey...does this comment box look different to anyone?  I've got a lot of buttons and such.)

on Oct 14, 2007
I do not believe secular humanism is a religion, though I do not necessarily argue the point. I think that fourth definition does fit, but only if the class of believers sees it as such. Secular humanism has no "service" no "liturgy" no "scripture" no "sacraments" no "vestments" commonly understood as religious in nature. Making it a religion only serves those who push it into that box to define it so. These are the people who would wish to take down any barrier between Church and State. Who would seek a world church...(BTW, Lula, you are making a conflicting statement here. You say on one blog you think everyone should be a Christian, yet here, denounce a One Religion for the world model. Which is it?)Moreover, Secular Humanism is not widespread as a organizational entity. It has become the boogeyman of fundies actually. People in the US are by and large "religious" in the ordinary, dare I say, hypocritical sense. And they are secular, which probably makes for the hypocrisy. But Secular Humanism and its manifesto are nearly arcane and relegated to the fringe, IMHO. I would be far more worried about the rise of legitimate, actual religious movements, such as Buddhism, if I were you.

See ya.

Oh, BTW, Buddhists may or may not believe in a God. Its a matter of personal choice. But because Buddhism is more properly, the Buddha Way (i.e., a set of practices rather than beliefs, per se) it is free from doctrinaire requirements.
on Oct 15, 2007
But when you get to Webster's 4th definition


you've very likely wandered fairly far from precise.

" anything done or followed with reverence or devotion"


'anything' is appropriate cuz using it to define religion makes damn near everything--from dining to dishwashing or scrapbooking to sex--a religion.

what about all those sports fans who devotedly follow their favorites?
on Oct 15, 2007
In 1965, the Supreme Court recognized Secular Humanism as a religion in its decision, the United States vs. Seeger.


once again...

what is or is not a religion cannot be decided by our courts. allowing for the possibility that ones personal philosophy may be equivalent in some respects to elements common to others' religious belief systems is something else entirely.

for further clarification, please CLICK HERE

you'll find:
(from the linked page)

The following United States Supreme Court cases have been selected for any/all references to secular humanism, a cite of Torcaso v Watkins, a religion of Humanism, etc. Notice that:

Not one single one of these cases hold that secular humanism is a religion.

Not a single one of these cases state that Torcaso v Watkins held that secular humanism was or is a religion.


on Oct 15, 2007
you're totally ignoring the following:

secular humanism (without the u/c 's' & 'h' please) is the very basis of our government.

what could be more humanist than government of people, by people for people?

what could be more secular than rejecting completely the notion that government is an extension of divine authority?
on Oct 15, 2007
if you're gonna insist on applying those tenets and manifestos, it's only fair that catholicism be defined by every proclamation issued by anyone in its name.
on Oct 15, 2007
'anything' is appropriate cuz using it to define religion makes damn near everything--from dining to dishwashing or scrapbooking to sex--a religion.

what about all those sports fans who devotedly follow their favorites?


well from a biblical POV anything that gets in the way of your relationship to God is an idol. So yes, sports can be a religion of sorts. I'm not saying you can't be a sports nut, but if it consumes you more than your worship of God or gets in the way of meeting with other belivers, than I would say you have an idol in your life.

Actually many people say as such. I've heard many times statements to the effect, "Well I don't go to church, but running is my religion. I worship while I run." or... "I'm worshiping God on the golf course."

You can be "religious" about anything.....including drinking beer!





on Oct 16, 2007
I do not believe secular humanism is a religion, though I do not necessarily argue the point. I think that fourth definition does fit, but only if the class of believers sees it as such.


SoDaiho,

Yes, even with your qualifyier , you can see that the fourth definition of religion fits with Secular Humansism. Add what we know from actual Supreme Court cases and some common sense, and it can be easily concluded that Secular Humanism is a religion.

The Humanist Manifestoes signers as well as the American Humanists refer to themselves as "religious (secular) humanists". Put those together with the millions of practicing secular humanists and they would be the class of believers that you mention.

Secular Humanism is called religious because if offers a doctrine that claims the ultimacy of religious truth. The Manifestoes affirm the relevance of religion as as "a shared quest for the good life" and established a social reform as one of the principal aims of religion.

Making it a religion only serves those who push it into that box to define it so.


What is the saying?....If the shoe fits....

As I just pointed out, it was the secular and atheistic humanists who in 1933 first identified themselves as religious humanists so we could easily say they are the ones who pushed secular humanism in the "religion" box. Since then, they've put their words into action and voila, the religion of Secular Humanism was established. It may be further defined as any philosophical, political, or cultural affirmation of man as the principal object of concern, to the exclusion of all Judeo-Christiological theses of his origin and destiny.

Sceular Humanism in its recent manifestations share charasticistcs with the teachings of the ancient Greek Protagoras whose well known dictum is that "man is the measure of all things". Another more simple definition of religious Secular Humanism is faith in man, science, and in education.

SoDaiho, you argue that

Secular humanism has no "service" no "liturgy" no "scripture" no "sacraments" no "vestments" commonly understood as religious in nature.


An argument could be made that it does. We find it in the government school system. Everyone understands that secular humanism has entered the public system of education. Kindergarten through 12th grade students are being systematically exposed and indoctrinated in Secular Humanist ideas under the guise of "neutrality".

By now, practically all public schools have compulsory sex-education classes taught in a variety of ways. In this morning's news I heard one of the middle schools, 6th -8th graders, 10 to 12 year olds is scheduled to have an in-school clinic for the purpose of dispensing artificial birth control and condoms, no doubt provided by Planned Parenthood.

In public schools, sex ed is explicitly anti-Christian, neutral on morality. The aim of most sex-ed programs, certainly those programs designed and implemented by Planned Parenthood and SIECUS, is to help students to become "safely" sexually active in any way they choose without moral scruple. The leading experts in the field of sexology are men such as Lester Kirkendall and Sol Gordon, both signers of the Humanist Manifesto II, who bluntly state that their purpose is to help students "get over their hangups".

So there is no doubt about the Secular Humanist connections of the people who plan and promote sex ed programs.

Is religion being taught in America's public schools? You bet it is. It's Secular Humanism..the schools replace the church..school administraters, school board members, and teachers are the priests...sex ed is the liturgy and birth control, abortion, etc. are the sacraments.



on Oct 16, 2007
Lula, I admire you, but you are mistaken. Public schools are not religious (you are aware public, school-led prayer is not permitted). They should be secular. Sexual education is not anti-Christian. It is about reproduction and in the public health sense, how to remain safe from STDs. So, in today's environment sex ed is a life saver and has nothing to do with religion other than alienate thoughtful, caring people from its religion itself due to the sort of leaping, stretching, and twisting you and KFC do to promote your fundamentalist cause.

Be well.
on Oct 16, 2007
Sodaiho posts
Public schools are not religious (you are aware public, school-led prayer is not permitted). They should be secular.


Yes, I know public schools aren't religious and are now totally secularized (except for allowing Muslims their prayer rug and prayer time!).

The relentless pressure to secularize America in general and public schools in particular came about through the courts brought on by special interest pressure groups like the ACLU, American Jewish Congress and Americans United for Separation of Chruch and State.

A successful lawyer, Leo Pfeffer, of the American Jewish Congress argued church state separation cases since WWII. He argued plausibly that court decisions have brought a "triumpth of Secular Humanism." SC Justice William O Douglas, a thorough Secular Humanist who had little use for religion played a key role in a number of cases. Justice Hugo Black was equally influential thought only "hypocrites" attend church and good men do not need to attend.

Anyway, in a series of decisions between 1948 and 1963 the Supreme Court essentially ruled that no religious exercise of any kind, including readings from the Holy Bible, general and non-denominational prayers, can be permitted in public schools.

I'll never understand secular humanists who continuously seek to expand the scope of freedom of expression at the same time want to restrict religious freedom as narrowly as possible; their aim to restrict religion to private practice only...(again except for Muslims)!

Secular humanists have seemingly had their way in public schools at least when it comes to fully restricting the Judeo-Christian ethos and morality.