Plus other various & sundry topics
Published on January 8, 2012 By lulapilgrim In Religion

ON another blog discussion about SCIENCE and GOD, the discussion sometimes turns solely towards religion, something that does not interest others.  

 

So, in an effort to continue the discussion, I’ve created this forum.

 

A fellow JUser posted the following:

 

I believe baptism is no longer necessary for salvation, for we already have salvation.

 

To which I asked: Why do you believe that Baptism is no longer necessary for salvation? 

The words of Christ are plain and who can change His words to mean something else?

"Unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Spirit, he cannot enter  into the kingdom of Heaven."

Baptism is sooooo important that Christ commanded His Apostles to "....baptize all nations in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit....."

In St. Mark 16:16, Christ promised salvation to all those who "believes and is baptized". Scripture teaches that Baptism is an indispensable pre-requisite for attaining salvation. 

As to the second part of your statement, that we already have salvation...

How so? We don't know for sure that we are saved until we've died, been judged and entered the gates of Heaven.

Redemption is not the same as salvation but it is a necessary prelude. 

Both Catholic and Biblical teaching is that salvation depends on the state of the soul at death. The Apoc. 21:27, teaches that "there shall not enter it (heaven) anything defiled, or that worketh abomination, or maketh a lie, but they that are written in the book of life of the Lamb."

As we have said, Christ has already redeemed us, and unlocked the gates of Heaven. He did His part, now we have to cooperate by doing ours. We can only pass through those gates IF our soul is in the right spiritual state (of grace) at the time of our death.

Salvation is all about how one enters death ... and that's why Our Lord gave us the Sacrament of Baptism which gives our soul sanctifying grace, removes Original Sin and makes us children of God and heirs to Heaven. That's why it's the first sacrament and one of the reasons why the Church insists that infants be baptized ASAP after birth. This practice dates from the Apostles.

AND THE RESPONSE WAS:

Getting back to the baptism thing. I asked my sister about baptism. This is what she had to say about it:

Luke 23:39-43
39 One of the criminals who were hanged railed at him,[d] saying, “Are you not the Christ? Save yourself and us!” 40 But the other rebuked him, saying, “Do you not fear God, since you are under the same sentence of condemnation? 41 And we indeed justly, for we are receiving the due reward of our deeds; but this man has done nothing wrong.” 42 And he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” 43 And he said to him, “Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in Paradise.”

Jesus told the one criminal that he would be with Him in Paradise (Heaven) and that criminal had not been baptized... he was crucified right then and there with Jesus.

We know for a fact that that criminal is in Heaven because Jesus said so. He was NEVER baptized! Baptism is something that we are instructed to do after salvation as a public profession of our faith. Baptism alone does not save us. If that were true, then all babies that have been baptized and never TRULY believe in Jesus and what He did for us and give their life to him, would go to Heaven... that is NOT AT ALL what the Word of God (Bible) says.

 She also said to look at these verses:

John 3:16
John 3:36
John 20:31

She did say though, that claiming that Jesus as the Son of God "does not cut it." She pointed out James 2:19


Comments
on Jan 08, 2012

 

Mortalkhrist,

Getting back to the baptism thing. I asked my sister about baptism. This is what she had to say about it:

Luke 23:39-43
39 One of the criminals who were hanged railed at him,[d] saying, “Are you not the Christ? Save yourself and us!” 40 But the other rebuked him, saying, “Do you not fear God, since you are under the same sentence of condemnation? 41 And we indeed justly, for we are receiving the due reward of our deeds; but this man has done nothing wrong.” 42 And he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” 43 And he said to him, “Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in Paradise.”

Jesus told the one criminal that he would be with Him in Paradise (Heaven) and that criminal had not been baptized... he was crucified right then and there with Jesus.

We know for a fact that that criminal is in Heaven because Jesus said so. He was NEVER baptized!

Yes, we agree, the criminal (whom Catholics know as Dismas, the penitent Thief) who was crucified alongside Christ is in Heaven.

Christ keeps His promises.

..............................................

Now to Dismas, the Penitent Thief, who is indeed looking down upon us from Heaven!  Was he baptized?  Yes, he was.

It is of faith in Christ that Baptism is a necessary, indispensable means of salvation and as has already been said, the words of Christ make that plain.

Furthermore, St. Paul teaches, "For as many of you as have been baptized in Christ, have put on Christ. And if you are Christ’s, then are you the seed of Abraham, heirs according to the promise." Gal. 3:27,29  

Here the Holy Spirit teaches that we are not only bathed and anointed by sanctifying grace by Baptism, but that there is an intimate union between the baptized person and Christ.

That's what happened to Dismas...he was baptized in Christ Jesus.

According to the teachings of the Church Doctors and Fathers, particularly St. Ambrose and St. Augustine, there are two other types of Baptisms---Baptism of Desire and Baptism of Blood or martyrdom for Christ.  

The Penitent Thief was baptized by desire which is associated with perfect contrition of sins based on charity. The Council of Trent teaches that justification from Original Sin is not possible "without the washing unto regeneration or the desire for the same." According to Scripture, perfect love possesses justifying power St.Luke 7:47and St.John 14:21.  "This day thou shalt be with Me in Paradise." St.Luke 23:43.

According to the subjective disposition, Baptism of  desire works by bestowing sanctifying grace which remits Original Sin, all actual sins, and the eternal punishment for sin. The Baptismal seal is not imprinted, nor is it the gateway to other Sacraments that normally follow the saving graces of Baptism by water and the Holy Spirit.

By reading St. Luke 23:39-43 we find the conversion of the Pentitent Thief, faith, hope and love for Jesus and a sincere confession, acceptance of his temporal punishment giving satisfaction for his sins.

 

 

 

on Jan 08, 2012

 

lulapilgrim
By reading St. Luke 23:39-43 we find the conversion of the Penitent Thief, FAITH, HOPE AND LOVE for Jesus and a sincere confession, acceptance of his temporal punishment giving satisfaction for his sins.

The penitent Thief, just before dying on the cross next to Jesus, although no longer able to amend his evil life, was contrite and by his own words that came no doubt from his heart, expressed faith, hope and charity (love). Those words were in effect , his good works.

Look closely at the incident of the Penitent's Thief's preparing for his final moments before his death.  Both thieves reproach Jesus is some measure St.Matt. 27:44, and eventually the penitent thief rebukes the unrepentant one and does this in the face of all the others jeering at Christ telling Him to save Himself. Jesus taught long before this "whoever acknowledges Me before men, I will also acknowledge him before My Father in Heaven." and Christ keeps His promises.

Next, the Penitent Thief asks the other thief, "Don't you fear God?" Doesn't that say something about him? In Acts and Romans we read that those who fear God are blessed with salvation.

In St.Luke 23:41, the Penitent Thief tells the other one that both of them are "punished justly". This shows an inner sense of justice that he is able to convict himself of sin before God. He says  of Jesus, "this Man has done nothing" realizing the goodness of Jesus. Next he says to Jesus, "Remember me when you come into your kingdom".

The Thief initiates the discussion. He admits his guilt. As God had blessed Cornelius in Acts 10 for his fear and devotion, so Jesus blessed the thief saying, "Today you will be with Me in Paradise."

It seems to me from careful reading that the thief already had faith in God as demonstrated by his fear of God that he expressed to the other thief. He now had to put that faith into action (good works) and he couldn't do that by using his arms and legs, so to speak, but he did so by reaching out to Jesus in perfect contrition of his passed sins, however limited in the way he was doing so.

Had he not reached out, he would have been condemned just like the unrepentant thief who remained silent.

The Penitent thief is a story of coming to Jesus in repentance of sin, seeking to be forgiven, albeit in this case a last minute one.

on Jan 08, 2012

St. Ambrose wrote the episode of the 2 thieves invites us to admire the designs of Divine Providence. Both thieves are in the same position--in the presence of the Eternal High Priest as He offers Himself in sacrifice for them and all mankind. One of them hardens his heart, despairs and blasphemes while the other repents, corresponds with grace and was thereby saved. He left the cross for Paradise. Here, St.Ambrose comments, “The Lord always grants more than one asks: the thief only asked Him to remember him, but the Lord says to him, “Amen, I say to thee, this day, thou shalt be with Me in paradise.”

FAITH, HOPE AND LOVE AND BAPTISM OF DESIRE


The conversion of the penitent thief was a miracle of grace won by the merits of Christ. When the thief saw the patience and gentleness in which Jesus suffered and how He repaid injuries with love, and when he heard Him address God as His Father, he opened his heart to grace and believed that Jesus was the Messias and the Son of God. With this “faith” there was awakened in hope and confidence in the power of the Redeemer to pardon him.

He had committed great crimes and now, at the point of dying, he hoped to receive pardon.

Love for Jesus also entered his heart and impelled him to do what he could to protect Him from the insults of the other thief whom he upbraided for his blasphemies. From his love of Jesus proceeded a deep contrition which he made known by a sincere confession of his great guilt, whereby he had deserved the punishment of death. He accepted his punishment and suffered willingly in satisfaction of his sins. He didn’t ask to be delivered from temporal punishment, but acknowledged that his sufferings were no more than his due. His conversion therefore was very real and perfect, and Our Lord remitted all his sins and promised him possession of Paradise.

on Jan 09, 2012

I see the difference of beliefs now. You are a Catholic, so you believe you need to have good works. First let me point out this verse:

Isaiah 64:6 (New Internation Version)

All of us have become like one who is unclean, and all our righteous acts are like filthy rags; we all shrivel up like a leaf, and like the wind our sins sweep us away.


Do you view baptism as a good work? That would explain why you view it as so important.

 

I always ask this question to people who believe you need good works for salvation:

Are you saying that Christ wasn't good enough to save you for all of your sins?

 

I find the belief in good works for salvation an insult to God. You are claiming that he wasn't good enough to get rid of all or your sins, and if you believe you have any chance of succeeding where you claim God has failed, you are dreaming.

Rather than viewing good works as something you have to do to be saved, I see them as a lifestyle. I want to live Christianity as a lifestyle, rather than practice it as a religion. I can't feel close to my savior if I see him as a strict boss, demanding that I get baptized or he will take back what he has already given to me. I view God as my hero, my savior. The being I can turn to for any problem, whether it be a small problem, or a big one. Someone who is always watching me, protecting me, even if I have put him into the back of my mind.

 

On a smaller note, thank you for this. I had forgotten about my LORD for so long, it feels good to be back with him.    

on Jan 10, 2012

I'm glad you responded. 

MortalKhrist
I see the difference of beliefs now.

Yes, I'm Cathollic and figured out you are  not when you wrote that you believe Baptism is no longer necessary for salvation, for we already have salvation which are two 15th century doctrines developed by the Protestant forefathers that have been handed down to their followers.

So yes, it's clear we have a difference of beliefs.

I believe that the whole of Christ's Gospel teaches Baptism is necessary for salvation and that believing in Christ doesn't mean we already have salvation.  St.James knocks the "belief alone" idea out when he teaches that even the demons believe in Christ and they most certainly are not assured of salvation for believing in Christ.

Baptism is necessary for the salvation of all men, becasue Christ has said, "Unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God." So, from the time of Christ this has been the unequivical teaching of the Church. The reason lies in the fact that only Baptism (again be it by water and the Holy Spirit, by blood of martyrdom or by Desire as in the case of the Penitent Thief) remits Original Sin, and no one with any taint of sin can enter Heaven. 

For me, the question that remains unanswered is how can anyone  claim that Baptism isn't necessary for eternal life when Christ Himself plainly said Baptism, (whether it be by water and the Holy Spirit, by Desire or by Matrydom) is necessary?

 

on Jan 10, 2012

 

MortalKhrist
You are a Catholic, so you believe you need to have good works. First let me point out this verse:

Isaiah 64:6 (New Internation Version)

All of us have become like one who is unclean, and all our righteous acts are like filthy rags; we all shrivel up like a leaf, and like the wind our sins sweep us away.


Do you view baptism as a good work? That would explain why you view it as so important.

So now "good works" is added to the mix and rightly so. 

No, I don't view Baptism as a "good work" (although whoever does the baptising in the name of Jesus Christ is doing good work, right?).  

To Catholics, Baptism is so important because Christ instituted it as a Sacrament and it's importance as being necessary for eternal life is shown throughout the Holy Bible. 

Jesus was baptized by St.John in the river Jordan, before He began His public life. The sacrament of Baptism was instituted by Christ then and commanded at His Ascension into Heaven.

We read in St.Matt. 28:19 that Christ said to His Apostles, "Go therefore make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit."

The Apostles obeyed His commands on the day the Church was born, the First Pentecost. St.Peter's first sermon preached Christ's Gospel and the multitudes believed and were converted. They asked "What shall we do?" And St. Peter said, "Repent and be baptized for every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, and you will recive the gift of the Holy Spirit." Acts. 2:38. 3,000 persons were baptized into Christ's new fledgling Apostolic Church.

To Cahtolics, Baptism is the sacrament by which the Holy Spirit gives our soul the new life of sanctifying (Divine) grace, removes the stain of Original Sin and actual sins and we become Christians, children of God, and heirs to Heaven.

  Catholics also believe that in Baptism the Holy Spirit imprints an indelible sign or Character on our soul that marks us as Christians and cannot be removed by anything. This character prevents the sacrament from being repeated; that is we can be baptized only once. "For all you who have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ." Gal. 3:27. 

 

on Jan 10, 2012

 

MortalKhrist


I always ask this question to people who believe you need good works for salvation:

Are you saying that Christ wasn't good enough to save you for all of your sins?



I find the belief in good works for salvation an insult to God. You are claiming that he wasn't good enough to get rid of all or your sins, and if you believe you have any chance of succeeding where you claim God has failed, you are dreaming.

Regarding your question (highlighted) ..the answer is NO. Your question shows you are making redemption and salvation as the same thing when Scripture teaches they clearly are not. Salvation and Justification are the result of grace with faith (belief) in Christ an essential condition. Rom. 3:22-26, Eph. 2:8-13; Phil 3:8-10.

In virtue of the bloody sacrifice of our Savior's life, remission of sin and sanctification were granted. But we aren't saved through faith alone, that is by confidently believing that we are. St.Paul knew the place of grace and was aware of the fact that man is free and can do good or evil works (sin). Faith in Christ is an essential condition but St.James teaches so along with that is doing good works. He teaches that by doing good works our faith is showing. In other words, by doing good works,  we are living the Christian faith.  St.James teaches faith if it hasn't works is dead. 2:17, 20.

MortalKhrist
Rather than viewing good works as something you have to do to be saved, I see them as a lifestyle.

Amen. It's both at the same time! Plain and simple, doing "good works" IS the Christian lifestyle. And to understand even better what good works have to do with our salvation we must turn to the scene of the last Judgment as depicted by Our Savior:

[31] And when the Son of man shall come in his majesty, and all the angels with him, then shall he sit upon the seat of his majesty. [32] And all nations shall be gathered together before him, and he shall separate them one from another, as the shepherd separateth the sheep from the goats: [33] And he shall set the sheep on his right hand, but the goats on his left. [34] Then shall the king say to them that shall be on his right hand: Come, ye blessed of my Father, possess you the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world. [35] For I was hungry, and you gave me to eat; I was thirsty, and you gave me to drink; I was a stranger, and you took me in:

[36] Naked, and you covered me: sick, and you visited me: I was in prison, and you came to me. [37] Then shall the just answer him, saying: Lord, when did we see thee hungry, and fed thee; thirsty, and gave thee drink? [38] And when did we see thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and covered thee? [39] Or when did we see thee sick or in prison, and came to thee? [40] And the king answering, shall say to them: Amen I say to you, as long as you did it to one of these my least brethren, you did it to me.

[41] Then he shall say to them also that shall be on his left hand: Depart from me, you cursed, into everlasting fire which was prepared for the devil and his angels. [42] For I was hungry, and you gave me not to eat: I was thirsty, and you gave me not to drink. [43] I was a stranger, and you took me not in: naked, and you covered me not: sick and in prison, and you did not visit me. [44] Then they also shall answer him, saying: Lord, when did we see thee hungry, or thirsty, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and did not minister to thee? [45] Then he shall answer them, saying: Amen I say to you, as long as you did it not to one of these least, neither did you do it to me.

[46] And these shall go into everlasting punishment: but the just, into life everlasting.

 

In this description those saved are those who did good works and those condemned are those who did no good works. St.Paul teaches in Col. 3:17 and 1Cor. 13:3 that good works must be done in the name of Christ and for the love of God. 

 

 

 

on Jan 10, 2012

MortalKhrist
I find the belief in good works for salvation an insult to God.

i hope after reading the scene of the Last Judgment in St.Matt. 25:31-46 you change your mind.

........................

MortalKhrist
I want to live Christianity as a lifestyle, rather than practice it as a religion.

For Catholics, living Christianity as a lifestyle and pracicing it as a religion is exactly the same thing.

Here's something that Pope Benedict XVI said just yesterday as he declares this coming year to be the "Year of Faith:.

 

 

"I know him in whom I have believed" (2 Tm 1:12). These words of St Paul help us to understand that faith is "first of all a personal adherence of man to God. At the same time, and inseparably, it is a free assent to the whole truth that God has revealed." Faith which is a personal trust in the Lord and the faith which we profess in the Creed are inseparable; they focus on each other and they require each other. There exists a profound bond between the lived faith and its contents. The faith of the Witnesses and Confessors is also the faith of the Apostles and Doctors of the Church.

Thus, the following recommendations for the Year of Faith desire to aid both the encounter with Christ through authentic witnesses to faith, and the ever-greater understanding of its contents. These proposals are intended as examples to encourage a ready response to the invitation of the Holy Father to live fully this Year as a special "time of grace."

The joyous rediscovery of faith can also contribute to consolidate the unity and communion among the different bodies that make up the wider family of the Church.

on Apr 07, 2012

From Zenit.org April 6, 2012 ....Fr. Cantalamissa's Good Friday Sermon

Among the personages of the Passion with whom we can identify, I realize that I have neglected to name one that more than all awaits those who will follow his example: the good thief.

The good thief made a complete confession of sin; he says to his companion who insults Jesus: “Do you not fear God, since you are under the same sentence of condemnation? And we indeed justly, for we are receiving the due reward of our deeds; but this man has done nothing wrong” (Luke 23:40f.). Here the good thief shows himself an excellent theologian. Only God in fact, if he suffers, suffers absolutely as innocent; every other being who suffers should say: “I suffer justly,” because even if he is not responsible for the action imputed to him, he is never altogether without fault. Only the pain of innocent children is similar to God’s and because of this it is so mysterious and so sacred.

How many atrocious crimes in recent times remained anonymous, how many unresolved cases exist! The good thief launches an appeal to those responsible: do like me, come out into the open, confess your fault; you also will experience the joy I had when I heard Jesus’ word: “”today you will be with me in Paradise!” (Luke 23:43). How many confessed offenders can confirm that it was also like this for them: that they passed from hell to heaven the day that they had the courage to repent and confess their fault. I have known some myself. The paradise promised is peace of conscience, the possibility of looking at oneself in the mirror or of looking at one’s children without having to have contempt for oneself.

Do not take your secret to your grave; it would procure for you a far more fearful condemnation than the human. Our people are not merciless with one who has made a mistake but recognizes the evil done, sincerely, not just for some calculation. On the contrary! They are ready to be merciful and to accompany the repentant one on his journey of redemption (which in every case becomes shorter). “God forgives many things, for a good work,” says Lucia to the Unnamed in Manzoni’s novel “The Betrothed”; with greater truth we can say, he forgives many things by one act of repentance. He promised it solemnly: “though your sins are like scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they are red like crimson, they shall become like wool” (Isaiah 1:18).

Let us take up now and do what we heard at the beginning, it is our task this day: with joyful voices let us exalt the victory of the cross, intone hymns of praise to the Lord. “O Redemptor, sume carmen temet concinentium”[8]: And you, O our Redeemer, receive the song we raise to you.

on Apr 07, 2012
The Crucifixion by Pieter Bruegel
 

This Day Thou Shalt Be With Me In Paradise.

 

                              During the time of the Crucifixion of Jesus, the two thieves were left lying on the ground at some distance off;  their arms were fastened to the crosses on which they were to be executed, and a few soldiers stood near on guard.  The accusation which had been proved against them was that of having assassinated a Jewish woman who, with her children, was travelling from Jerusalem to Joppa.  They were arrested, under the disguise of rich merchants, at a castle in which Pilate resided occasionally, when employed in exercising his troops, and they had been imprisoned for a long time before being brought to trial.

 

     The thief placed on the left-hand side was much older than the other;  a regular miscreant, who had corrupted the younger.  They were commonaly called Dismas and Gesmas, and as I forget their real names I shall distinghish them by these terms, calling the good one Dismas, and the wicked one Gesmas.  Both the one and the other belonged to a band of robbers who infested the frontiers of Egypt: 

 

..........and it was in a cave inhabited by these robbers that the Holy Family took refuge when flying into Egypt, at the time of the massacre of the Innocents.  The poor leprous child who was instantly cleansed by being dipped in the water which had been used for washing the infant Jesus, was no other than this Dismas, and the charity of his mother, in receiving and granting hospitality to the Holy Family, had been rewarded by the cure of her child;  while this outward purification was an emblem of the inward purification which was afterwards accomplished in the soul of Dismas on Mount Calvary, through that Sacred Blood was then shed on the cross for our redemption.   Dismas knew nothing at all about Jesus, but as his heart was not hardened, the sight of the extreme patience of our Lord moved him much. 

 

     The crosses of the two thieves were placed, the one to the right and the other to the left of Jesus.  Nothing can be imagined more distressing than the appearance of the thieves on their crosses;  they suffered terribly, and the one on the left hand side never ceased cursing and swearing.

 

     I cast my eyes upon Jesus-----Jesus my Redeemer, -----the Redeemer of the world.  I beheld Him motionless, and almost lifeless.  I saw nothing distinctly, excepting my beloved Spouse hanging on the cross.  I contemplated His disfigured countenance, His Head encircled with that terrible crown of thorns, which prevented His raising it even for a moment without the most intense suffering, His mouth parched and half open from exhaustion, and His hair and beard clotted with blood.  His chest was torn with stripes and wounds, and His elbows dislocated, blood constantly trickled down from the gaping wounds in His hands and the flesh was so torn from His ribs that you might almost count them.  His legs and thighs, as also His arms, were stretched out almost to dislocation, and the flesh and muscles so completely laid bare that every bond was visible, and His whole body covered with black, green, and reeking wounds.  The blood which flowed from His wounds was at first red, but it became by degrees light and watery, and the whole appearance of His body was that of a corpse ready for interment.  And yet, nothwithstanding the state of ignominy to which He was reduced, there still remained that inexpressible look of dignity and goodness which had ever filled all beholders with awe.

 

    The complexion of our Lord was fair, like that Mary, and slightly tinted with red;  but His exposure to the weather during the last three years had tanned Him considerably.  His chest was wide, but not hairy like that of St. John the Baptist;  His shoulders broad, and His arms and thights sinewy;  His knees were strong and hardened, as is ususally the case with those who have either walked or knelt much, and His legs long, with very strong muscles;  His feet were well formed, and His hands beautiful, the fingers being long and tapering, and although not delicate like those of a woman, still not resembling those of a man who had laboured hard.  His neck was rather long, with a well-set and finaly proportioned head;  His forehead large and high;  His face oval;  His hair, which was far from thick, was of a golden brown colour, parted in the middle and falling over His shoulders;  His beard was not any great length, but pointed and divided under the chin. 

 

     When I contemplated Him on the Cross, His hair was almost all torn off, and what remained was matted and clotted with blood;  His body was one wound, and every limb seemed as if dislocated.

 

PRAYER

 

Dear Jesus! 

 I do not want to know the wisdom of the world; 

 I do not want to know on whose anvil snow-flakes are hammered or the hiding-place of darkness or from whose womb came the ice, or why the gold falls to the earth earthly, and fire climbs to the heavens heavenly; 

 I do not want to know literature and science, or the four-dimensional universe in which we live; 

 I do not want to know the length of the universe in terms of light years; 

 I do not want to know the breadth of the earth as it dances about the chariot of the sun; 

 I do not want to know the heights of the stars, chaste candles of the night; 

 I do not want to know the deptsh of the sea or the secrets of its water palace. 

 I want to be ignorant of all these things. 

 I want only to know the length, the breadth, the height and the depth of Thy redeeiming Love on the Cross, Sweet Saviour of Men. 

 I want to be ignorant of everything in the world------everthing but You, dear Jesus. 

                              And then, by the strangest of strange paradoxes, I shall be wise!  Amen.

 

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