Published on April 1, 2010 By lulapilgrim In Current Events

 

A Must See! A 10 minute video meditation on the various wounds of sin which plague humanity, wounds that were borne by Jesus on the Cross. The drama of Christ's Passion shows how Divine Mercy bore our wounds and wants to heal us. An Excellent Lenten preparation for the Sacred Triduum!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrFBX03Bnno

 


Comments (Page 1)
on Apr 01, 2010

For Catholics, today is Holy Thursday. The Epistle reading for today comes from the Apostle, St.James 5:13-16 which begins with "Is any of you sad? Let him pray."

 

 

 

on Apr 02, 2010

Sins per this video (with very sad music to make clear the evil):

 

1. Secular government

Where does Jesus say that secular government are wrong? What if we introduced Hindu prayers at schools? Would that help?

 

2. Atheism

Because we care if other people believe what we want them to believe.

There are no gods, no devils, no angels, no heaven or hell.

I don't believe in hell or devils or other post-Jewish inventions. How evil am I?

Religion is but myth and superstition that hardens hearts and and enslaves minds.

Unfortunately it does for so many people.

 

3. "American greed"

Damn people who don't judge others and just trade with them!

In Greed We Trust

I do. Turns out trusting in greed is often more helpful than trusting those who claim to follow G-d.

 

4. Wounds of Sexual Impurity

I am in Ireland. Do we really want to discuss the influence organised Christian religion has on sexual impurity?

 

5. Wounds of contraception

Huh?

 

6. Embryonic stem cell research

The first actual moral dilemma the video points out.

 

7. Cloning

Huh?

 

8. Wounds of addictions

Is drug abuse particularly common among non-Christians or atheists? Didn't know.

 

9. Wounds of child abuse

Really? Oh, it's just soooo difficult not to comment this further.

 

10. Divorce

Women should be forced to stay with a man they don't love.

 

11. Pornography

Name two examples for societies with pornography that work less well than two societies where pornography is strictly forbidden!

 

12. Child trafficking

Again, is this a particular problem among non-Christians or atheists? Incidentally, in many parts of the world religions actively support child marriage.

 

13. Homosexuality

How is this a wound? Because you disagree with it? I find homphobes a wound.

 

14. Suicide

A big problem. Let's add to it by stigmatising gays! How many homosexuals kill themselves because of atheism and how many kill themselves because of intolerant believers? Ask yourself, have you been a force against or for suicide among homosexuals?

 

15. AIDS

Which brings us back to contraception... Christianity is here cause and cure at the same time.

 

16. War

Luckily religion never makes people fight.

 

17. Genocide

If only people listened to preachers more!

 

18. Abortion

Agreed.

 

19. Indifference

But religion can help make you feel better about not caring. For example, you can start hating people because they are gay (and as evil as criminals).

 

The churches were filled after 9-11. Where are those people now?

What could possible have made them abandon religion?

And this this same phenomenom affect all religions or just certain forms of Christianity?

 

 

 

 

on Apr 02, 2010

"Is any of you sad?
Wow. Bad grammar in the Bible. How sad.

I didn't know Jesus was a pederast.

on Apr 02, 2010

I didn't know Jesus was a pederast.

That was common among the Greek population at the time.

Many Jewish laws against homosexuality were probably made up to counter assimilation into the Greek world. Judaism has always formulated laws that make assimilation difficult.

 

on Apr 02, 2010

I once saw in interview with Gene Simmons, a Jew (don't know if he practices, but he is a very intelligent man) who said that Judaism "is all about assimilation; dress British, think Yiddish."

And, just out of curiosity, how are devils and hell "post-Jewish"? They're described in the Old Testament.

on Apr 02, 2010



I once saw in interview with Gene Simmons, a Jew (don't know if he practices, but he is a very intelligent man) who said that Judaism "is all about assimilation; dress British, think Yiddish."



I was talking about Jewish law, not what Jews actually do. There wouldn't be Jewish laws against assimilation if they were not necessary.

Think about why restaurants have "no dog" signs but no "no elephants" signs.

Just consider this: I am speaking English with you as well. If I didn't follow Jewish traditions to some extent, I'd be completely assimilated indeed. I believe Gene Simmons was born in Israel. Part of his family came from Hungary, like mine.




And, just out of curiosity, how are devils and hell "post-Jewish"? They're described in the Old Testament.



I wouldn't know where the Old Testament (i.e. Hebrew Bible) describes hell. I think Christians took their concept of hell from Arab (i.e. south of Israel) legends and Zoroastrianism.

As for devils, in Judaism "Satan" is an angel who points G-d to evil deeds but he does not cause them, humans do. The character is not seen as evil.

In fact, Judaism doesn't have a concept of "evil". We differentiate between human inclination to be egoistic and the ability and will to follow G-d's law. Eating pork, for a Jew, is against G-d's will, but it is not "evil". The Hebrew word translated as "evil" is "ra3" (Resh Ayin, VERY difficult to pronounce) covers actual evil things as well as the instinct to eat or build a house. The good-vs-evil duality is a Zoroastrian thing.

The exists a Jewish legend about the angel who started a revolt against G-d in heaven and was banished from heaven for it, but it is not part of the Jewish (or Samaritan) religion. The native Kurdish religion follows up with the tale that the angel later saw the wrong and apologised, cried so much that the hell fires were extinguished, and is now back at G-d's side.



on Apr 02, 2010

I think Christians took their concept of hell from Arab (i.e. south of Israel) legends and Zoroastrianism.

And from fictional writings, such as Dante's Inferno.

on Apr 02, 2010

Leaki you really must read and aquaint yourself with the OT writings.  David certainly believed in evil as did all the prophets. 

in the OT, evil (ra) is a complex term indicating both evil acts and the consequences of these acts.  In the NT the OT concept is further refined.  Human beings are and do "kakos" (evil).  This is because humanity is flawed. This evil suggests an absence of good.   

"Evil spirits" is another name for demons and it is they who instigate the evil behind these evil acts just as God instigates the good in good acts.  The war before us is not a physical one but a spiritual one.  Just because we can't see the spirit world doesn't mean it doesn't exist.  We do see the effects of it.  Just like we see the effects of wind but can't really "see" wind itself.   

God has revealed standards of right and wrong and human government to restrain the expression of evil in society.  God acts to punish evil often by bringing disaster on persons and nations who violate his standards and harm others.  Isaiah 45:7, Jeremiah  18:11, Amos 3:6

I've been using this scripture for Obama lately but it was originally penned by David in the Psalms.  It says:

"Let his days be few and let another take his office."  109:8

*tongue in cheek* God does say we are to pray for our leaders doesn't he? 

I wouldn't know where the Old Testament (i.e. Hebrew Bible) describes hell. I think Christians took their concept of hell from Arab (i.e. south of Israel) legends and Zoroastrianism.

Hell in Hebrew is "sheol" and actually means death or grave.  The grave in the OT sense is the place where the dead await final judgment.  The OT speaks of a resurrection for the righteous and the wicked but does not deal with the question of what happens to the individual after death. 

Sheol is used 65 times in the OT. 

"But he knows not that the dead are there and that her guests are in the depths of hell (sheol)."  Proverbs 9:18

on Apr 02, 2010

The exists a Jewish legend about the angel who started a revolt against G-d in heaven and was banished from heaven for it, but it is not part of the Jewish (or Samaritan) religion.

Well I think this legend has it's beginnings in the Jewish OT scriptures.  You will see a reference to Lucifer in Isaiah's OT writing 14:12-15 in part it says:

"How you are fallen from heaven O Lucifer son of the morning!  How you were cut down to the ground which did weaken the nations!....Yet you shall be brought down to hell to the sides of the pit." 

As far as a revolt against God goes, Satan means "adversary."  He is the determined enemy of God and of those whom God loves.  We see him as early as Gen 3 in the temptation of Eve corrupting the human rqce.  He appears in Job 1 and also seen as a personal being in 1 Chron 21:1 and Zechariah 3:1,2. 

The NT has much more to say about Him with many other names and descriptive phrases attached to him. 

on Apr 02, 2010

Infidel

I think Christians took their concept of hell from Arab (i.e. south of Israel) legends and Zoroastrianism.
And from fictional writings, such as Dante's Inferno.

Um.....Dante got it from Christianity, not the other way around.

on Apr 02, 2010

Leaki you really must read and aquaint yourself with the OT writings.  David certainly believed in evil as did all the prophets.

I am quite familiar with the writings. David believed in ra3, as I said.

You are assuming that "ra3" is what think of as "evil", but it isn't. In Hebrew the word is used to refer to lots of things, including the urge to eat and the instinct to build a house. 

 

in the OT, evil (ra) is a complex term indicating both evil acts and the consequences of these acts.  In the NT the OT concept is further refined.  Human beings are and do "kakos" (evil).  This is because humanity is flawed. This evil suggests an absence of good.   

I don't mind what it says in the Christian Bible, but while ra3 is complex it is not the same as evil.

 

"Evil spirits" is another name for demons and it is they who instigate the evil behind these evil acts just as God instigates the good in good acts.  The war before us is not a physical one but a spiritual one.  Just because we can't see the spirit world doesn't mean it doesn't exist.  We do see the effects of it.  Just like we see the effects of wind but can't really "see" wind itself.   

I can feel wind, I cannot feel evil spirits.

 

Hell in Hebrew is "sheol" and actually means death or grave.  The grave in the OT sense is the place where the dead await final judgment.  The OT speaks of a resurrection for the righteous and the wicked but does not deal with the question of what happens to the individual after death. 

Sheol means grave or abyss. It doesn't mean "hell". The Greek pagan "hades" was just the closest equivalent and hence was used to translate the word. But that doesn't mean that Jews believe in hell or that the Jewish Bible does.

 

Sheol is used 65 times in the OT. 

Yes, and it never means "hell".

 

As far as a revolt against God goes, Satan means "adversary."  He is the determined enemy of God and of those whom God loves. 

Not in Judaism.

Christianity got that from Zoroastrianism.

 

We see him as early as Gen 3 in the temptation of Eve corrupting the human rqce.  

The Hebrew Bible doesn't say that.

 

 

 

on Apr 02, 2010

Just like we see the effects of wind but can't really "see" wind itself.

So wind is supernatural?

on Apr 02, 2010

Um.....Dante got it from Christianity, not the other way around.

I mean the ideas of eternal fire and torment. What do you mean?

on Apr 02, 2010

Sheol means grave or abyss. It doesn't mean "hell". The Greek pagan "hades" was just the closest equivalent and hence was used to translate the word. But that doesn't mean that Jews believe in hell or that the Jewish Bible does.

Didn't I say as much?  Yes, sheol and hades are both pretty much the same; one Hebrew one Greek but both basically are God's waiting room type of place.  Gehenna is the real hell; the place of fire and torment. 

Jesus himself associated gehenna with fire that burns eternally, and he stated that fiery punishment has been prepared for the devil and his angels.  Jesus spoke more often of hell than of heaven.  Hell was not created for humanity but for the devil and his angels.  Actually God  acted at great personal cost to freee us from the threat of eternal punishment (John 3:18)

The Hebrew Bible doesn't say that.

What do you mean? 

I can feel wind, I cannot feel evil spirits.

Philosophers have pondered the existence of evil for centuries.  Many have felt evil.  I have.  I remember watching the news one day and this soldier was talking about Somolia and how you could actually feel the evil there because it was so thick and eerie.  I've known some who've been to countries who practice witchcraft and voo-doo and say the presence of evil is palpable. If you're making a habit of walking in the spirit you can't help but feel evil when you come across it.  If you can't feel evil, as you say, you can surely see the effects of it right?  We can see evil all around us.  It can be in the form of a look, a gesture, an act.  

 I also believe if you're walking with evil (like walking with the wind) you won't feel it.  It's only when you are opposed to it by going against it (like going against the wind) can you really feel evil.   I'm a runner and the worst time for me to run is when it's really windy.  When I go against the wind not only can I feel its mighty power but it can also restrain me from getting where I need to go efficiently.   When I turn the corner and have the wind against my back, running with it, I actually can feel the heat because I no longer feel the wind anymore and that's when my body temperature rises and I get noticebly hotter.  Interesting isn't it? 

I read the news daily and can see lots of evil in the actions and words of others. 

on Apr 02, 2010

Sheol means grave or abyss. It doesn't mean "hell".

Sheol is parallel to Hebrew words for "pit" or "hell" so that's why it's sometimes called hell although like I said it's more like a waiting place for the dead not the literal hell (gehenna).  But "Sheol" is used of a place of conscious existence after death in the OT.  According to Job it is an undesireable place for the wicked (Job 24:19) and a refuge for the righteous (Job 14:13). 

Jesus teaching in Luke 16 seems to reflect accurately the OT concept of sheol; it is a place of conscious existence after death, one side of which is occupied by the suffering unrighteous dead separated by a great chasm from the other side peopled by the rightesous dead enjoying their reward.  After the crucifixion the thought is one side is now empty with the other awaiting final judgment. 

As far as a revolt against God goes, Satan means "adversary." He is the determined enemy of God and of those whom God loves.

Not in Judaism.


Leauki I believe the Hebrew word for adversary is literally Satan.  Can you look that up?  It means a person who opposes or fights against another.  The root is found quite a few times in the OT. 

The idea eventually developed that Satan was the adversary from the OT (Job 1:6-2:7).